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ECE Professor Kaustav Banerjee and researchers reveal an advance in precision superlattices materials

September 28th, 2017

illustration of an electron beam creating a 2D superlattice Illustration on the right shows an electron beam (in purple) being used to create a 2D superlattice made up of quantum dots having extraordinary atomic-scale precision and placement

Control is a constant challenge for materials scientists, who are always seeking the perfect material — and the perfect way of treating it — to induce exactly the right electronic or optical activity required for a given application.

One key challenge to modulating activity in a semiconductor is controlling its band gap. When a material is excited with energy, say, a light pulse, the wider its band gap, the shorter the wavelength of the light it emits. The narrower the band gap, the longer the wavelength.

As electronics and the devices that incorporate them — smartphones, laptops and the like — have become smaller and smaller, the semiconductor transistors that power them have shrunk to the point of being not much larger than an atom. They can’t get much smaller. To overcome this limitation, researchers are seeking ways to harness the unique characteristics of nanoscale atomic cluster arrays — known as quantum dot superlattices — for building next generation electronics such as large-scale quantum information systems. In the quantum realm, precision is even more important.

New research conducted by UC Santa Barbara’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering reveals a major advance in precision superlattices materials. The findings by Professor Kaustav Banerjee, his Ph.D. students Xuejun Xie, Jiahao Kang and Wei Cao, postdoctoral fellow Jae Hwan Chu and collaborators at Rice University appear in the journal Nature Scientific Reports.

Their team’s research uses a focused electron beam to fabricate a large-scale quantum dot superlattice on which each quantum dot has a specific pre-determined size positioned at a precise location on an atomically thin sheet of two-dimensional (2-D) semiconductor molybdenum disulphide (MoS2). When the focused electron beam interacts with the MoS2 monolayer, it turns that area — which is on the order of a nanometer in diameter — from semiconducting to metallic. The quantum dots can be placed less than four nanometers apart, so that they become an artificial crystal — essentially a new 2-D material where the band gap can be specified to order, from 1.8 to 1.4 electron volts (eV).

This is the first time that scientists have created a large-area 2-D superlattice — nanoscale atomic clusters in an ordered grid — on an atomically thin material on which both the size and location of quantum dots are precisely controlled. The process not only creates several quantum dots, but can also be applied directly to large-scale fabrication of 2-D quantum dot superlattices. “We can, therefore, change the overall properties of the 2-D crystal,” Banerjee said.

Each quantum dot acts as a quantum well, where electron-hole activity occurs, and all of the dots in the grid are close enough to each other to ensure interactions. The researchers can vary the spacing and size of the dots to vary the band gap, which determines the wavelength of light it emits.

“Using this technique, we can engineer the band gap to match the application,” Banerjee said. Quantum dot superlattices have been widely investigated for creating materials with tunable band gaps but all were made using “bottom-up” methods in which atoms naturally and spontaneously combine to form a macro-object. But those methods make it inherently difficult to design the lattice structure as desired and, thus, to achieve optimal performance.

The UCSB Current – “Band Gaps, Made to Order” (full article)

Nature Scientific Reports – "Designing artificial 2D crystals with site and size controlled quantum dots"

Banerjee's COE Profile

Banerjee's Nanoelectronics Research Lab (NRL)