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ECE Professor Kaustav Banerjee’s Nanoelectronics Research Lab’s work on two-dimensional atomically-flat transistors shows promise for next generation green electronics

June 20th, 2013

back-gate field effect transistor schematic UC Santa Barbara researchers demonstrate first n-type field effect transistors on monolayer tungsten diselenide with record performance

Researchers at UC Santa Barbara, in collaboration with University of Notre Dame, have recently demonstrated the highest reported drive current on a transistor made of a monolayer of tungsten diselenide (WSe2), a 2-dimensional atomic crystal categorized as a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD). The discovery is also the first demonstration of an “n-type” WSe2 field-effect-transistor (FET), showing the tremendous potential of this material for future low-power and high-performance integrated circuits.

Monolayer WSe2 is similar to graphene in that it has a hexagonal atomic structure and derives from its layered bulk form in which adjacent layers are held together by relatively weak Van der Waals forces. However, WSe2 has a key advantage over graphene.

“In addition to its atomically smooth surfaces, it has a considerable band gap of 1.6 eV,” explained Kaustav Banerjee, professor of electrical and computer engineering and Director of the Nanoelectronics Research Lab at UCSB. Banerjee’s research team also includes UCSB researchers Wei Liu, Jiahao Kang, Deblina Sarkar, Yasin Khatami and Professor Debdeep Jena of Notre Dame. Their study was published in the May 2013 issue of Nano Letters.

CoE News Release (full release)

Study in Nano Letters, May 2013

Nanoelectronics Research Lab